Cornell Doodle Notes = Best of Both Worlds

If you have subscribed to my blog for any amount of time, then you know that I love doodle notes. I have also written about using Cornell notes as well. Toward the end of the year, I stumbled across the best of both of these note-taking methods = CORNELL DOODLE NOTES!

Basically, you combine the organization of Cornell notes with the graphic organization of doodle notes. Over the summer I have been converting a lot of my notes into this style of note-taking.

Here are a couple of examples of notes that I’ve created so far:

From my BIG BANG THEORY Notes –

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From my WHERE WE ARE IN THE UNIVERSE Notes –

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I love that I can combine graphics and notes in such a well-organized way. I cannot wait to use these with my students! Have you thought of any new ideas this summer?

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Long Range Planning

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In the past, I have been dependent upon pacing guides and curriculum maps. I knew the units of study at the beginning of the year. Then, I just planned week by week using that as my guide. However, what I found was that I would spend too much time on some topics and gloss over others.

This year I wanted to intentional about long-range planning. So, I looked at each standard and came up with the main topics. Sort of the top five or so for each standard. my plan is to spend one week on each main topic. I am hoping this will help me not to rush through things and also with retention of information.

I’ll give you updates about how my planning is working out as the year progresses. How do you long range plan?

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Teacher Feature: EzPz-Science

EzPz-Science

Earlier in the year as I was looking on TeachersPayTeachers for scientific method resources, I came across EzPz-Science. She has some really cute stuff that later I found my self coming back to again and again.

On her main page she says that her goal is to increase student engagement with fun and creative lessons for middle school science. I personally think she is doing a phenomenal job.

The first resource that I ever used from her was a seek and find. It is a picture that contains key vocabulary words. Read more about them here in a blog post by EzPz Science!

Check out this freebie (a.k.a my first resource from her)

Scientific Method Seek and Find Science Doodle Page

I really want to try out her seek and sorts as well. You can find all her amazing resources along with more information at https://ezpz-science.com/ 

Using Discussion Chips for Science Discussions

I love having a scientific conversation in my room. However, I want to hold everyone accountable and contribute to the discussion. As I was researching ways to hold students accountable I came across an awesome Kagan Strategy called Talking chips.

From kaganonline.com

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So basically you give students discussion chips and each time they talk they place their chip in the middle. If they run out then they have to wait until everyone has run out of chips. This works great for small groups and with the correct set up the entire class.

I usually set a specific topic of discussion. Then, I use poker chips as discussion chips, but any math manipulative would work. How do you regulate discussion in your classroom?

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Socratic Seminar in Science

When I taught ELA, I used Socratic seminar a lot. It was a way to have student-generated discussions and it was something that I learned during student teaching. In this post, I am going to give you some information and tips for using this in science class!

What is Socratic seminar?
It is a method of discussion inspired by Socrates. Socrates believed in order to teach people you would not give them answers. Rather you would ask questions and help them arrive at answers on their own.

So how does it work?

For ELA I had students prepare questions and evidence for something that we had read. This is a viable option for Science as well, however, I think it could also work to discuss a phenomenon or an experiment completed in class. This is where science Socratic seminar would be different. It would not be entirely literary based.

Before you try to implement a Socratic seminar, I think it would be very important to explain what evidence is in science. I have found this is the most tricky part for my students.

I would also go over the following guidelines and explicitly explain what will happen and how things will work.

Student Guidelines for Socratic Seminar:
1. Come prepared having read the required reading or completed the activity for discussion, and with some questions or topics to discuss.
2. Be an active listener and speaker. Contribute to the discussion.
3. One Voice – only one person can speak at one time.
4. Be respectful (even if you do not agree).
5. Use evidence or examples from your reading or activity.
6. Explain your answers – a simple yes or no is not acceptable you must explain.

Role of Student and Teacher

As a teacher, you will simply be a facilitator of the discussion. Students will be expected to generate the discussion. I usually have a checklist ready and I explain to my students that they must contribute to the discussion a set number of times. Then I just check off when they contribute.

Want to try it?

I am excited to try this in my classes and I hope you will try it too. Below is a resource to help you further (I created it for ELA teachers, but I think it is helpful for science too).

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SocraticSeminarStudentandTeacherGuide

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