Cornell Doodle Notes = Best of Both Worlds

If you have subscribed to my blog for any amount of time, then you know that I love doodle notes. I have also written about using Cornell notes as well. Toward the end of the year, I stumbled across the best of both of these note-taking methods = CORNELL DOODLE NOTES!

Basically, you combine the organization of Cornell notes with the graphic organization of doodle notes. Over the summer I have been converting a lot of my notes into this style of note-taking.

Here are a couple of examples of notes that I’ve created so far:

From my BIG BANG THEORY Notes –

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From my WHERE WE ARE IN THE UNIVERSE Notes –

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I love that I can combine graphics and notes in such a well-organized way. I cannot wait to use these with my students! Have you thought of any new ideas this summer?

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How I Taught – THE WATER CYCLE

I would venture to say that of all the science topics that I teach the water cycle has the MOST resources. If you search for the water cycle on TpT- HUNDREDS of resources will come up at all different levels. This year, I truly believe that I have finally found peace with the way that I teach the water cycle. So many times I think we second guess ourselves (or at least I do) and the way that we present certain topics. However, this year I am very happy with how my lesson on the water cycle turned out.

How I Started the Lesson

I am a huge fan of scavenger hunts and I especially like to introduce a topic using these. The one I have used for the past three years for this topic is great. It has all the key information and a secret code for students to figure out.

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At the beginning of class, I gave the students the scavenger hunt paper and then explained that the cards were all around the room (even under chairs and so forth). I had a prize for the student who found all the information first. Then, once everyone understood the goal I set them loose to run around the room. They had a BLAST!!

Once everyone finished gathering the information, I passed out highlighters and explained we would be using the information they just gathered as our notes. We then read through the information and highlighted key vocabulary. I did have to add a note about groundwater and how that led to infiltration because it is a keyword in our Georgia Standards.

Reader’s Theater

To further expose students to the key vocabulary and how the water cycle works we quickly read through a reader’s theater. I don’t know about you, but my kids HATE reading from the book. However, if I pull out a reader’s theater they volunteer like crazy. Almost every student wants a part!

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Doodle Notes – OF COURSE!! 

After we read through the notes and found out information about key vocabulary. Students completed a set of doodle notes. They had information to fill-in using their notes and a color code to follow.

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At the End of Class – Day #1

At the end of this class period, students completed an exit ticket. It was an old one from what my partner teacher called “The Good Book.” It is an Earth Science book by Carson-Delossa.

LAB DAY!!

Now my lab is a bit different. Instead of making a cloud in the bottle or something like that I have my students go through the water cycle.

First, we read a book together as a class. The book we read is called Drop Around the World. I give each student a different page to look at. They have to tell where the drop journeyed, what step of the water cycle he went through and evidence for how they knew. The cool thing about this book is on every page the drop is hidden somewhere in the picture. It is a big hit!

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After we discuss the book student receive their journey paper and I explain they will now be taking a journey as a water droplet.

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Around the room, I set up stations for different stops along the water cycle. Students start at one point and roll the dice to journey to the next stop. Sometimes they get stuck in one place and sometimes they go to twelve different places. This experience helps students to see that the cycle is not always in three perfect steps (Students collect beads at each location and make a bracelet to represent their journey – totally optional).

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When their journey ends students write the story of their journey. These are always super-fun to read.

Around the Room Circuit

This year to end the lab day students completed an around the room circuit about the water cycle. They did great on this assignment!

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Basically, students start with any question in the room and each answer leads them to a new question. At the end, they should end up back where they started. It is great because students can check themselves based on the path they take.

All in all, I loved my lesson and I really think my students learned the information in a fun and interactive way! Do you want to use some of the ideas I mentioned? If so, just click on any image to be linked to that resource! Happy Teaching!!

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Cornell Notes – What they are and how I use them…

As I was searching through new ways to complete notes with my students I stumbled across cornell notes. I had never used them as a student, but they looked pretty interesting. SO, I decided to give them a try and I love them. For topics when I don’t have doodle notes or I just need to change things up – I pull out cornell notes.

What are Cornell Notes?

Basically it is a way to organize notes into one-two pages of condensed information. On one side you put key vocabulary, questions or things you want to pull out from the main ideas. Then, on the second side – you put your main ideas. At the bottom there is a space for a summary – Yay! Great way to get students to reflect on their learning!

An Example of My Cornell Notes:wp-15420354605574771571906824360260

These are notes that I made to go along with our textbook. We have super old textbooks, but they still have some good information and diagrams. I liked these because I added space for students to draw their own diagrams.

How do I make my Cornell Notes?

I use an awesome template that I found for FREE on TpT. I am adding a photo-link below. It is super easy to use and input your own information! original-2937656-1

I hope you found this helpful! What type of note-taking strategies do you use? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Top 3 Ways I Use Doodle Notes

Doodle notes are a staple in my classroom. I use them for ALMOST every topic that we cover. They give students access to information in a fun and exciting way (not to mention the retention). In my day to day classroom practice I find myself presenting them to students in three different ways.

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PowerPoint – This is probably the easiest way to incorporate doodle notes, especially if you are just starting out. You can present the information that needs to be filled in on a ppt slide and use it in the same way that you would traditional notes.

I do this quite frequently especially if I have more information other than what is covered on the doodle notes to present. If you want to go the extra mile you can scan in your doodle notes and cover up the information with white text boxes.

Some doodle notes products on TpT also have PowerPoints to accompany the doodle notes, which is super helpful and something to look for when purchasing.

2 Document Camera – One of the ways that I mostly present my doodle notes is by using my document camera. During my first block I will put a blank set of notes under the document camera and fill it/color code them with my students. I teach 6 classes, so for the subsequent classes I add sticky notes over the information and present them a la Vanna White – removing the sticky notes as we discuss each item.

3Written Set of Directions –If students need some independent work to work on or maybe you have presented the information in a different set of notes or even if you have a textbook that might have the information that they need, then you could provide a written set of directions. Let’s face it, there is always that one day when you need something for students to be able to work on by themselves. I have done this when I had an emergency and had to leave some work for a substitute. To write directions I just go through the notes and tell them what to write for each item explicitly or I tell them where they can go to find the information.

I hope that my top three help you think through ways to present doodle notes in your classroom. How do you present your doodle notes? Let me know in the comments below!

I LOVE Doodle Notes!

 

For the past four years I have been using interactive notebooks in my classes. My students glue all of their notes and other classwork type items into their spiral notebook. When I first started I was using tons of foldables and all of those foldables took a TON of time. Don’t get me wrong I love a good foldable, however, now I am more intentional about using them.

Enter the doodle notes. As I  was trying to find a way for my interactive notebooks to not be so time consuming (I wanted time consumed with content and not putting together items), I found doodle notes. Doodle notes are an engaging and visual way to take notes. Sometimes students are asked to draw diagrams with their notes and other times the diagrams are provided for them to color code.

Here is an example of the doodle notes that I used for Eclipses in my classroom. Notice it had fill in the blank portions, but the students also had to add to each diagram about lunar and solar eclipses. If you want to use these in your class – click the image – it is from another TpT author.

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I love doodle notes because they really help my students retain the information. They are writing, color-coding and drawing as they learn new content. This has became a way for students to interact with their notes in an intentional way!

DO you use doodle notes in your classroom? Tell me about it in the comments below, and don’t miss my next post about the three ways I use doodle notes!